Monday, August 12, 2019

pssRRL accepted: Coulomb Blockade Spectroscopy of a MoS2 Nanotube

We are happy to be able to announce that our manuscript "Coulomb Blockade Spectroscopy of a MoS2 Nanotube" has been accepted for publication by pssRRL Rapid Research Letters.

Everybody is talking about novel semiconductor materials, and in particular the transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), "layer materials" similar to graphene. With a chemical composition of TX2, where the transition metal T is, e.g., tungsten W or molybdenum Mo, and the chalcogenide X is, e.g., sulphur S or selenium Se, a wide range of interesting properties is expected.

What's by far not so well known is that many of these materials also form  nanotubes, similar to carbon nanotubes in structure but with distinct properties inherited from the planar system. Here, we present first low temperature transport measurements on a quantum dot in a MoS2 nanotube. The metallic contacts to the nanotube still require a lot of improvements, but the  nanotube between them acts as clean potential well for electrons.

Also, our measurements show possible traces of quantum confined behaviour. This is something that has not been achieved yet in planar, lithographically designed devices - since these have by their very geometric nature larger length scales. It means that via transport spectroscopy we can learn about the material properties and its suitability for quantum electronics devices.

A lot of complex physical phenomena have been predicted for MoS2, including spin filtering and intrinsic, possibly topologic superconductivity - a topic of high interest for the quantum computing community, where larger semiconductor nanowires are used at the moment. So this is the start of an exciting project!

"Coulomb Blockade Spectroscopy of a MoS2 Nanotube"
S. Reinhardt, L. Pirker, C. Bäuml, M. Remskar, and A. K. Hüttel
Physica Status Solidi RRL, doi:10.1002/pssr.201900251 (2019); arXiv:1904.05972 (PDF)

Tuesday, July 2, 2019

Where's the best sciences research in Germany? Here in Regensburg!

The Nature Index 2019 Annual Tables have been published, and there is a valuable new addition: the tables now include a "normalized ranking", where the quality of a university's research output, and not its quantity counts. If we look at the world-wide natural sciences ranking, University of Regensburg is at spot 44, best of all universities in Germany, and in a similar ranking range as, e.g., University of Oxford, University of Tokyo, or University of California San Francisco! Cheers and congratulations!

Thursday, May 2, 2019

Lecture announcement: High Frequency Engineering for Physicists

Term has already started, so this announcement is technically a bit late, however... This summer term I'm offering a lecture "High Frequency Engineering for Physicists". If you plan to work with signals in the frequency range 10MHz - 50GHz, this might be interesting for you...

When and where? Wednesdays, 12h - 14h, seminar room PHY 9.1.10. The next lecture is on 8 May 2019
  • Concepts and formalisms for the frequency range 10MHz - 50GHz
  • Handling equipment for this frequency range, designing devices and measurements
  • Using this frequency range in a (millikelvin) cryostat
More information can be found soon on the homepage of the lecture.

See you next wednesday!

Tuesday, April 30, 2019

Wednesday, February 27, 2019

PRL published: Shaping electron wave functions in a carbon nanotube with a parallel magnetic field

We're happy to announce that our manuscript "Shaping electron wave functions in a carbon nanotube with a parallel magnetic field" has been published as Editor's Suggestion in Physical Review Letters.

When a physicist thinks of an electron confined to a one-dimensional object such as a carbon nanotube, the first idea that comes to mind is the „particle in a box“ from elementary quantum mechanics. A particle can behave as a wave, and in this model it is essentially a standing wave, reflected at two infinitely high, perfect barrier walls. The mathematical solutions for the wave function describing it are the well-known half-wavelength resonator solutions, with a fundamental mode where exactly half a wavelength fits between the walls, a node of the wave function at each wall and an antinode in the center.

In this publication, we show how wrong this first idea can be, and what impact that has. In a carbon nanotube as quasi one-dimensional system, an electron is not in free space, but confined to the lattice of carbon atoms which forms the nanotube walls. This hexagonal lattice, the same that also forms in planar form graphene, is called bipartite, since every elementary cell of the lattice contains two carbon atoms; one can imagine the nanotube wall as being built out of two sub-lattices, with one atom per cell each, that are shifted relative to each other. Surprisingly, the hexagonal bipartite lattice does not generally support the half-wavelength solutions mentioned above, where the electronic wave function becomes zero at the edges. In each sublattice, we can only force the wave function to zero at one end of the nanotube "box"; its value at the other end remains finite. This means that the wave function shape for each of the two sublattices is more similar to that of a quarter wavelength resonator, where one end displays a node, the other an antinode. The two sublattice wave functions are mirrored in shape to each other, with node and antinode swapping position.

When we now apply a magnetic field along the carbon nanotube, a magnetic flux enters the nanotube, and the boundary conditions for the electron wave function change via the Aharonov-Bohm effect. Astonishingly, its shape along the carbon nanotube can thereby be tuned between half-wavelength and quarter-wavelength behaviour. This means that the probability of the trapped electron to be near the contacts changes, and with it the tunnel current, leading to a very distinct behaviour of the electronic conductance. It turns out that our measurement and the corresponding calculations are agreeing very well. Thus, our work shows the impact of a non-trivial host crystal on the electronic behaviour, important for many novel types of material.

"Shaping electron wave functions in a carbon nanotube with a parallel magnetic field"
M. Marganska, D. R. Schmid, A. Dirnaichner, P. L. Stiller, Ch. Strunk, M. Grifoni, and A. K. Hüttel
Physical Review Letters 122, 086802 (2019), Editor's Suggestion; arXiv:1712.08545 (PDF, supplementary information)

Thursday, October 18, 2018

Comp. Phys. Comm. published: "Lab::Measurement - a portable and extensible framework for controlling lab equipment and conducting measurements"

We're happy to announce that our article "Lab::Measurement — a portable and extensible framework for controlling lab equipment and conducting measurements", describing our measurement software package Lab::Measurement, has been published in Computer Physics Communications.

Lab::Measurement is a collection of object-oriented Perl 5 modules for controlling lab instruments, performing measurements, and recording and plotting the resultant data. Its operating system independent driver stack makes it possible to use nearly identical measurement scripts both on Linux and Windows. Foreground operation with live plotting and background operation for, e.g., process control are supported. For more details, please read our article, visit the Lab::Measurement homepage, or visit Lab::Measurement on CPAN!

"Lab::Measurement - a portable and extensible framework for controlling lab equipment and conducting measurements"
S. Reinhardt, C. Butschkow, S. Geissler, A. Dirnaichner, F. Olbrich, C. Lane, D. Schröer, and A. K. Hüttel
Comp. Phys. Comm. 234, 216 (2019); arXiv:1804.03321 (PDF)

Friday, May 18, 2018

PRL accepted: Nanomechanical characterization of the Kondo charge dynamics in a carbon nanotube

Today's great news is that our manuscript "Nanomechanical characterization of the Kondo charge dynamics in a carbon nanotube" has been accepted for publication by Physical Review Letters.

The Kondo effect is a many-body phenomenon at low temperature that results from a quantum state degeneracy, as, e.g., the one of spin states in absence of a magnetic field. In its simplest case, it makes a quantum dot, in our case a carbon nanotube with some trapped electrons on it, behave very different for an even and an odd number of electrons. At an even number of trapped electrons, no current can flow through the nanotube, since temperature and applied bias voltage are too low to charge it with one more elementary charge; this phenomenon is called Coulomb blockade. Strikingly, at odd electron number, when two degenerate quantum states in the nanotube are available, Coulomb blockade seems not to matter, and a large current can flow. Theory explains this by assuming that a localized electron couples to electrons in the contacts, forming a combined, delocalized singlet quantum state.
What carries the Kondo-enhanced current, and how does the electric charge now accumulate in the carbon nanotube? We use the vibration of the macromolecule to measure this. As also in the case of, e.g., a guitar string, the resonance frequency of a nanotube changes when you pull on it; in the case of the carbon nanotube this is sensitive enough to resolve fractions of the force caused by a single elementary charge. From the vibration frequency, as function of the electrostatic potential, we calculate the average number of electrons on the nanotube, and can then compare the odd and even number cases.
A surprising result of our evaluation is that the charge trapped on the nanotube behaves the same way in the even and odd occupation case, even though the current through it is completely different. Sequential tunneling of electrons can model the charge accumulation, and with it the mechanical behaviour. The large Kondo current is carried by virtual occupation of the nanotube alone, i.e., electrons tunneling on and immediately off again so they do not contribute to the charge on it.

"Nanomechanical Characterization of the Kondo Charge Dynamics in a Carbon Nanotube"
K. J. G. Götz, D. R. Schmid, F. J. Schupp, P. L. Stiller, Ch. Strunk, and A. K. Hüttel
Physical Review Letters 120, 246802 (2018); arXiv:1802.00522 (PDF, HTML, supplementary information)